Latest News Syria: Google

Image

Google Alert – latest news Syria SANA – May 30, 2013

1 new result for latest news Syria SANA

Syria’s Bashar Assad is vague on whether Russian S-300 missiles have been 
Brandon Sun
Classified Sites: Careers · Obituaries · Classifieds · eTearsheet Instructions. You are here: Brandon Sun > World > International Breaking News > Syria’s Bashar Assad is vague on whether Russian S-300 missiles have been delivered to Syria  This 
See all stories on this topic »

Photos: Obama and Google. On 3.14.2012, America’s Defense Department’s best-known geek announced that she was leaving the Pentagon for a job at Google. This is why the Google posts are focused on U.S. politics.

Islamic Education Center – Farsi School – Persian letters

Iran.farsisschool.keyboard-layouthttp://www.farsischool.com/farsinevis.html

On this site you can convert (transliterate) persian written in english letters, called Pinglish or Finglish, to persian language script. You can directly email the text or save it as a document from this site:

http://www.behnevis.com/en/index.html
http://mrwhatis.com/farsi-nevis.html

Persian language and litterature:
http://www.iranchamber.com/literature/articles/history_literature.php

Literature and Poetry (Iran government):
http://www.parstimes.com/literature/

Sint-Gillis – Saint-Gilles – La Barrière

Image

La Barrière de Saint-Gilles (Bareel van Sint-Gillis en néerlandais) est un important rond-point de Bruxelles, situé au cœur de la commune de Saint-Gilles, au croisement de la chaussée de Waterloo, de la chaussée d’Alsemberg, de l’avenue du Parc, de la rue Théodore Verhaegen, de la rue de l’Hôtel des Monnaies et de la rue Paul Dejaer. C’est un important nœud routier, tant pour les voitures que pour les trams et les bus.

L’appellation Barrière fait référence à un péage à barrière qui y était situé au XVIIe siècle.

Ce site était autrefois dénommé Wintmolenberch (la montagne au moulin à vent), par référence aux trois moulins à vent qui s’y dressaient aux 16e et 17e siècles. Ils furent détruits vers 1672 en vue de la construction du fort de Monterey, qui effleurait la place actuelle par l’Ouest.

À partir de 1871, le terminus des omnibus à chevaux de la Bourse se trouvait à la Barrière.

Depuis le 10 avril 1900 la Porteuse d’eau de Julien Dillens occupe le centre du rond-point.

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barri%C3%A8re_de_Saint-Gilles

François Truffaut – The ‘Nouvelle Vague’

Image

François Truffaut,  (born Feb. 6, 1932, Paris, France — died Oct. 21, 1984, Neuilly-sur-Seine, near Paris), French film critic, director, and producer whose attacks on established filmmaking techniques paved the way for the movement known as the Nouvelle Vague (New Wave).

Truffaut was born into a working-class home. His own troubled childhood provided the inspiration for Les Quatre Cents Coups (1959; The 400 Blows), a semiautobiographical study of a working-class delinquent. It is the first of the Antoine Doinel trilogy, tracing its hero’s evolution from an antisocial anguish to a happy and settled domesticity. When it won the best direction prize at the 1959 Cannes film festival, Truffaut was established as a leader of the French cinema’s New Wave—a term for the simultaneous presentation of first feature films by a number of French directors—a tendency that profoundly influenced the rising generation of filmmakers around the world.

The New Wave marked a reaction against the commercial production system: the well-constructed plot, the limitations of a merely craftsmanlike approach, and the French tradition of quality with its heavy reliance on literary sources. Its aesthetic theory required every detail of a film’s style to reflect its director’s sensibility as intimately as a novelist’s prose style retraces the workings in depth of his mind—hence the term le camera-stylo (“camera-pen”). The emphasis lay on visual nuance, for, in keeping with a general denigration of the preconceived and the literary, the script was often treated less as a ground plan for a dramatic structure than as merely a theme for improvisation. Improvised scenes were filmed, deploying the visual flexibility of newly developed television equipment (e.g., the handheld camera) and techniques (e.g., extensive postsynchronization of dialogue). The minimization of costs encouraged producers to gamble on unknown talents, and the simplicity of means gave the director close control over every aspect of the creative process, hence Truffaut’s term auteur, or film author.

Outside his art, Truffaut was reticent about his private life, although it is known that he was sent to a reformatory before leaving school at age 14 to work in a factory. His interest in the cinema, however, brought him to the attention of the critic André Bazin, doyen of the monthly avant-garde film magazine Cahiers du cinéma, who incorporated him into the staff. For eight years Truffaut asserted himself as the most truculent critic of the contemporary French cinema, which he considered stale and conventional, and advocated a cinema that would allow the director to write dialogue, invent stories, and, in general, produce a film as an artistic whole in his own style. Thus, he was influential in the cinema world before he actually made a film. Like his leading character in Baisers volés (1969; Stolen Kisses), another film in the Doinel series, he deserted from his military service, being committed to various prisons until he was able to resume his journalistic career and, eventually, put his ideas into creative practice. Again like Doinel in Domicile conjugale (1970; Bed and Board), he married and became the father of two daughters.

Truffaut’s initial creative effort, the short piece Les Mistons (1958; The Mischief Makers), depicted a gang of boys who thoughtlessly persecute two young lovers. His second short, Une Histoire d’eau (1959; A Story of Water), was a slapstick comedy for which Jean-Luc Godard developed the conclusion. Both films met with sufficient appreciation to facilitate his first feature-length film, Les Quatre Cents Coups. An evocation of the adolescent’s pursuit of independence from a staid adult world of conformity and protocol, for which Truffaut evinced a romantic sympathy, the film proved to be one of the most popular New Wave films, especially in England and the United States. Two tenderly pessimistic studies in sexual tragedy followed—Tirez sur le pianiste (1960; Shoot the Piano Player), adapted from a U.S. thriller (Down There by David Goodis), a genre for which Truffaut displayed great admiration, and Jules et Jim (1962).

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/607111/Francois-Truffaut

Ban Ki-moon: Friend to U.S. national interests in United Nations

Image

Ban Ki-moon became the first U.N. secretary general to visit the Pentagon…

===

‘Elected during the Bush administration, Ban was seen as a welcome change from the difficult relationship we had had with Kofi Annan. Former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations John Bolton and former U.S. secretary of state Condoleezza Rice openly supported Ban, and the Obama administration has also backed him. One day after Ban announced his desire for reelection, President Obama confirmed his support for the incumbent, praising Ban’s responses to global crises and commitment to the United Nation’s much-needed internal reform. Ban’s reelection could be doubly beneficial then for the United States. As a friend to U.S. national interests in the United Nations, Ban is well positioned to advance U.S.-backed approaches in the Middle East, North Africa, and North Korea.’

http://csis.org/publication/why-ban-ki-moon-good-united-states

http://www.defensenews.com/article/20130418/DEFREG02/304180023/U-N-Chief-Unprecedented-Visit-Pentagon

Photo: U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel greets U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon at the Pentagon on April 18 2013 (Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty Images)

 

Friends of Pierre Vigny introduced la canne in Brussels

Image

Pierre Vigny is considered one of the most innovative masters of la canne. He created a system that could be best described as a mixture of several indigenous European self defence methods, resulting in one of the most complete and effective stick fighting methods ever devised…

Friends of Vigny introduced la canne in Brussels. In the historic streets of Saint-Gilles one can still see many people walking around with canne.

 
***
 
By the 19th century, the walking stick had become the hallmark of distinction, authority and strength. For the gentlemen of the era, it was not only an indispensable fashion accessory but also a source of confidence, security and nonverbal deterrence on the streets of Europe. In its various designs and configurations, the walking stick was also valued at home, where it served as an objet d’art and an effective weapon against invaders.

The French developed the walking stick into a formidable self-defense tool that became known as la canne.Adopted into the traditional savatetraining halls of the 1800s, it’s remained by the side of the kicking art for more than 200 years.

The Birth of La Canne

Pierre Vigny was one of the most innovative masters of la canne. Born in France in 1869, he began training in savate, English boxing and fencing at a young age. During his teenage years, he often ventured from one academy to another, learning new martial arts techniques and testing his skills against anyone who’d pick up a sword, stick or pair of boxing gloves.

In 1886 he joined the army, where he served as the fencing master for the second regiment of the French artillery at Grenoble. After leaving the military in 1889, he moved to Geneva and opened a combat academy. During this period, he devoted several years to the perfection of his own method of la canne.

Pierre Vigny devised a system that could be described as a mixture of several indigenous European self-defense methods. Many of the passes, thrusts and wards resembled fighting techniques from German swordsmanship, and a collection of the foot skills were borrowed from savate and French boxing.

Upon receiving an offer from Edward W. Barton-Wright to assume the position of chief instructor at the Bartitsu School of Self-Defence, Vigny relocated to England in the late 1890s and introduced la canne and savate to the British. During his time there, he met and trained with two celebrated jujutsu instructors: Yukio Tani and S.K. Uyenishi. From them, he acquired new martial arts techniques for his already efficient repertoire of self-defense skills, after which he formulated his method of personal combat, which included moves from wrestling, savate, jujutsu and sword dueling. The addition of the new techniques was deemed necessary because of the rise of hooliganism throughout England.

Perfecting La Canne

Pierre Vigny’s skill as a fighter and teacher attracted the attention of both the working class and the aristocracy. He served as a coach at the London Boxing Club and instructed at Aldershot Military School. Seeking better business opportunities, he moved to London, where he opened a school in 1903 under the patronage of Grand Duke Michael of Russia and became director and manager of the New School of Self-Defence and Fencing Academy. Interestingly, his wife also taught there, offering ladies instruction in the use of the parasol and the steel-spiked umbrella.

The syllabus at the school catered to students who were interested in a variety of fighting arts. Even though he conducted classes in the fencing foil, sword, savate and self-defense from morning to night, la canne remained Vigny’s pet project. He taught courses that lasted 12 weeks, a length of time he believed was sufficient to give the average person the ability to handle almost any emergency.

Shunning the lighter assault canes that were popular in the academic training halls—Pierre Vigny referred to them as “chopsticks”—he believed that a true walking stick should be rigid and sturdy. Because of his dislike for the less-functional models, he had one produced to his own specifications. Termed the “Vigny self-defense stick,” it was made from a medium-weight Malacca cane with a metal knob mounted on the end. The heavy ball served as the point of percussion, thus adding instant knockout effectiveness to the weapon.

La Canne Goes Global

By 1912 London held little interest for Pierre Vigny, so he returned to Geneva, where he managed the Academy of Sports and Defence for a number of years. He put the finishing touches on what is arguably the most complete and effective stick-fighting system ever devised. Several police, military and martial arts academies adopted his syllabus.

During the 1920s, Superintendent Henry G. Lang, an English officer of the Indian police, was required to search for a less-than-lethal equalizer to oppose the commonly carried lathi. While on leave, he traveled to Europe to learn the Vigny system, and upon his return to India, Lang produced a syllabus that he documented in the now-classic book The “Walking Stick” Method of Self-Defence.

In 1941 Henry G. Lang’s manual was translated into Hebrew, and for a time it was adopted into the kapap curriculum, later to be included as part of the training undertaken by an Israeli spec-ops unit known as Palmach. It’s estimated that up to 50,000 Israelis received training in the walking-stick method.

Pierre Vigny’s influence also reached the United States through jujutsu and fencing instructor Charles Yerkow. By the early 1940s, Yerkow had written a series of books titled Modern Judo: The Complete Ju-Jitsu Library, which served as a supplemental manual for American hand-to-hand combat teams. The section on stick play is based on Henry G. Lang’s “Walking Stick” Method.

Today, practitioners of Vigny la canne are privileged to be able to tap into a system that’s time tested, versatile and still very workable on the street. Anyone looking for a backup to his or her unarmed skills would do well to consider it, for it’s as relevant now as it was 100 years ago.

La Canne: Savate’s Walking-Stick Weapon Art:
http://www.blackbeltmag.com/daily/mixed-martial-arts-training/boxing/la-canne-savate%E2%80%99s-walking-stick-weapon-art/

La canne Vigny – The walking stick method of self defence:
http://lacannevigny.wordpress.com/pierre-vigny/

The Walking Stick in Mandatory Palestine and Israel:
http://lacannevigny.wordpress.com/israel-connection/the-walking-stick-in-mandatory-palestine-and-israel/